Brooklyn family comes back to CT shoreline

Bill Carbone (upper left) with 9-year-old daughter Veda (lower left), 14-year-old son Taavi (upper right), wife Amy Tate (lower right) and dog Shiloh B. Dinkins (lower center) on the steps of the brownstone in Brooklyn, N.Y. The family will be moving to Guilford, Conn. in June. 

Bill Carbone (upper left) with 9-year-old daughter Veda (lower left), 14-year-old son Taavi (upper right), wife Amy Tate (lower right) and dog Shiloh B. Dinkins (lower center) on the steps of the brownstone in Brooklyn, N.Y. The family will be moving to Guilford, Conn. in June. 

Contributed by Bill Carbone

Madison, Conn. native Bill Carbone felt a “gravitational pull” towards New York City since he was a child. College took him to Boston, and graduate school brought him to Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn., where he and his wife Amy Tate owned a house and started their family. 

But when Carbone got a job in 2016 writing curriculum at the Rock and Roll Forever Foundation in New York, he and his wife “took this crazy plunge” and moved into New York.

Carbone and his family moved into the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, and five years later, Carbone is the executive director of the foundation. He and his family rode out the pandemic in Brooklyn and were “pretty comfortable” doing so. But with a pivot to a hybrid remote work schedule and an eye on the future, Carbone said he started thinking about moving his family back to their home state. 

“More than anything, living in New York is breathtakingly expensive,” he said. “There's a voice in the back of my head that I have to be more thoughtful about that…My kids are getting older. More than anything, I want to make sure that I can help them the way my parents did — to always know that if something bad happens, I have a safety net — and I want to do that for them.”

Wanting their kids to finish the school year in New York, Carbone said once he and his wife decided on their move back to Connecticut, they began house hunting in February 2021. After one “false start” in the process of purchasing a home, Carbone said it took several months before they purchased their “kind of funky and unique” home in Guilford. He saw it via FaceTime while Amy toured it. 

While he and his family are ready to make the move, Carbone said he has mixed feelings about leaving behind the city he has always loved. 

“We're really excited to have our own space where we can make our decisions about it,” he said. “But we’re also nervous, because it's a big change. We live in a city community in which we walk outside and see our neighbors right away…We live in this culture of people making the best of being right on top of each other, which I love. So I'm worried about what it's going to feel like to … have true distance from other people.”

One thing making the move easier is the network of family and friends they will be returning to, which includes Carbone’s Connecticut band, Max Creek. 

“As a musician, I am going to get back to Connecticut and have lots of people to play with,” he said. “My wife teaches a course at Wesleyan and already picked up a course in Quinnipiac. We're returning to this place where there’s great stuff waiting for us, and we're super excited.”