Three months ago, Wilton Public Schools said good-bye to Molly Rollison — who retired after 27 years of working in the school district — and welcomed Lucille DeNovio as the superintendent’s new administrative assistant.
DeNovio, a Brookfield resident and mother of two, started working in the Wilton school district as a high school registrar in 2006, and worked in the human resources department for the last three years.
She said she decided to apply for the administrative assistant position “mainly because of Dr. [Kevin] Smith,” who became superintendent of Wilton schools last year.
“I really like his working style and I thought it would be a really good fit,” said DeNovio, who was also “anxious to tackle a new role.”
Prior to coming to Wilton, DeNovio worked in Weston’s school district for about 10 years, where she held different positions, including working for its assistant superintendent.
Whereas human resources involved “mainly dealing with employees,” DeNovio said, being an assistant to Weston’s assistant superintendent allowed her to deal more with the community and help parents.
“You were more able to wear your ‘parent hat,’ and I was interested in doing that,” she said. “One of the reasons I like working in the schools is for that reason. I like the parent and student connection.”
As Wilton’s new superintendent’s assistant, DeNovio said, her job is to “assist Dr. Smith and try to do everything that I am capable of to allow him time to focus on his needs and priorities.”
“You get some parents call and they’re not always positive, so I do try to help parents and listen and direct them so that they can get the help or attention they need in a timely manner,” she said.
“Kevin is very busy during the day and it’s not that it’s not his priority — it’s just that these come in all the time.”
DeNovio said her responsibilities also include preparing documents, keeping the public informed, building relationships and trying to keep Dr. Smith in touch with students and what is going on in the district.
DeNovio said the hardest part about her new position is just that — it’s new.
“I think it’s hard for anybody when they start a new position,” she said.
“It’s hard to step into somebody else’s shoes who has been here for that amount of time and follow what they’ve done, all while trying to make things more efficient.”
Although she doesn’t “know everything that [she] don’t know,” DeNovio said, she is confident she can do the job.
“I’m sure there are things that are going to come about that I had no idea were my responsibility and that’s OK,” she said. “Dr. Smith is understanding and the Board of Education is great. They have been wonderful and supportive.”
DeNovio said the best part about her new job is “seeing that the students and staff are comfortable — I’m glad I’m part of that.”
“I like that students know who I am and that they come in here and feel comfortable enough to have me relay messages to Dr. Smith,” said DeNovio. “I haven’t found anything I don’t like — I like everything about the job.”