Wilton will lose 88 people between 2015 and 2020, and 211 more between 2020 and 2025, if United States Census Bureau projections are correct.

According to data provided by the Connecticut Data Collaborative, Wilton had a population of 17,914 in 2015 and is projected have a population of 17,826 in 2020 and 17,615 in 2025.

Meanwhile, Connecticut’s total population is projected to rise from 3,644,545 in 2015 to 3,702,469 in 2020 and 3,746,181 in 2025.

While Darien, Easton, New Canaan, Ridgefield and Westport are projected to decline as well, Wilton is projected to have the largest five-year population drop — 211 residents between 2020 and 2025 — of all the DRG-A towns.

In Redding, however, the population is projected to increase by 37 between 2015 and 2020 — from 9,196 to 9,233 — before decreasing by 10 in 2025. Similarly in Weston, the population is projected to increase by 13 between 2015 and 2020 — from 10,173 to 10,186 — before decreasing by 32 in 2025.

Male vs. female


Wilton had about 8,694 male residents and 9,220 female residents in 2015, according to the Census Bureau, with boys between the ages of 15-19 as the largest demographic (1,053 persons), followed by girls ages 10-14 (1,029).

Women ages 25-29 were the least populated demographic in 2015 (16), followed by men in that same age group (19).

Women are expected to outnumber men in 2020 as well, by 572 people. That year, girls ages 15-19 will be the most populated demographic (1,092), followed by boys ages 15-19 (1,042), while women ages 30-34 are projected to be the least populated demographic (24), followed by men in that same age group (26).

In 2025, there are projected to be 9,117 female residents and 8,498 male residents in Wilton, with women ages 55-59 being the most populated demographic (951), followed by boys ages 15-19 (902).

The least populated demographic in 2025 is projected to be men ages 90 and over (74), followed by men ages 35-39 (90).

Age groups


While the populations of Wilton’s 0-19 and 40-64 age groups are projected to gradually decline over the next nine years, its 20-39 and 65-and-older populations are expected to grow.

The 0-19 age group population is projected to lose 910 residents between 2015 and 2020, and 873 more between 2020 and 2025:


  • 2015: 5,712.

  • 2020: 4,802.

  • 2025: 3,929.


The town’s 20-39 age group is projected to gain 698 more residents between 2015 and 2020, and 864 more between 2020 and 2025:

  • 2015: 1,713.

  • 2020: 2,411.

  • 2025: 3,275.


Wilton’s 40- to 64-year-old population is projected to lose 197 residents between 2015 and 2020, and 656 more between 2020 and 2025:

  • 2015: 7,796.

  • 2020: 7,599.

  • 2025: 6,943.


Wilton’s senior citizen population — those 65 and older — is projected to gain 420 more residents between 2015 and 2020, and 355 more between 2025 and 2020:

  • 2015: 2,693.

  • 2020: 3,113.

  • 2025: 3,468.


More than one-third of Connecticut's population is over the age of 50, according to Connecticut’s Legislative Commission on Aging , and this proportion will continue to rise due to medical, social and economic advances.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 13.8% of Wilton's population in 2010 was over the age of 65. That percentage rose to 15% in 2015, and is projected to rise to 16.9% in 2020 and 19.7% in 2025.

Because growing numbers of older adults want to “stay in their communities and to have choice, independence and dignity,” according to the Commission on Aging, Connecticut needs "age-diverse communities” that support residents “across the lifespan.”

At the March 15 Wilton Board of Finance meeting, Higgins Groups real estate agent Marianna LaSala said there are senior citizens in Wilton who are “just barely getting by with [their] taxes.”

Wilton residents like Cannon Road resident Sara Curtis have expressed concerns about taxes and their effect on the town’s senior citizens.

During the March 28 public hearing on Wilton’s proposed 2016-17 school budget, Curtis said she has been a Wilton taxpayer for 36 years and has she has seen her taxes go up almost 400%.

“It’s not a joke when you’re a senior who has lived here for 60 years and really in some ways have no place to go,” she said.

Connecticut has the third highest life expectancy in the nation at 80.8 years, according to the Commission on Aging, and the state’s 65-and-older population is projected to grow by 57% between 2010 and 2040.