Wilton has one of the highest rates of traffic stops in Connecticut, according to the Institute for Municipal and Regional Policy at Central Connecticut State University’s Traffic Stop Data Analysis and Findings for 2014-15.

For this year’s report, released May 12, the institute analyzed 586,000 traffic stops conducted by Connecticut State Police and local police departments between October 2014 and September 2015.

With a driver population of 12,973 and 4,773 traffic stops, Wilton had the eighth highest rate of traffic stops — 368 stops per 1,000 residents.

Newtown had the highest rate of traffic stops in the state, with 494 stops per 1,000 residents.

In Fairfield County, Ridgefield had the second-highest rate of traffic stops (426 stops per 1,000 residents), followed by Monroe (389 stops per 1,000 residents) and New Canaan (379 stops per 1,000 residents).

Manchester had the lowest rate of traffic stops in the state, with 61 stops per 1,000 residents. In Fairfield County, Shelton had the lowest rate of traffic stops (18 stops per 1,000 residents).

In the entire state, which has a driver population of 2,825,946, 586,849 traffic stops were made between October 2014 and September 2015, equating to 208 stops per 1,000 residents.


Demographics


About 87% of motorists pulled over in Connecticut were Connecticut residents, according to the report, and “of the stops conducted by police departments other than state police, 92.2% were Connecticut residents.”

Approximately 63% of drivers stopped were male, and drivers between the ages of 21 and 30 were pulled over most, at 29.7%.

As for race, the majority of stops in Connecticut were of white drivers (70.6%), followed by black drivers (14.1%), Hispanic drivers (12.5%), and other races (2.8%).

At 24.74%, Wilton had the 11th highest percentage of minority stops in Fairfield County. Bridgeport had the highest percentage in the county, at 65.41%, followed by Stratford (54.93%) and Norwalk (42.56%).


Violations


The No. 1 violation between October 2014 and September 2015 was speeding (26%), followed by cell phone use (10%).

The Portland Police Department had the highest ratio of speeding tickets following speed-related stops (69.1%), followed by Suffield (61.8%) and Newtown (53.8%).

Middlebury had the highest cell phone violation rate in the state at 37.9%, followed by Hartford (34.3%) and Danbury (29.9%).

Nearly 28% of stops in Wilton were speed-related and about 9% were cell phone-related. Other reasons for stops in Wilton were:


  • Defective lights: 14.52%.

  • Registration: 11.88%.

  • Moving violation: 9.87%.

  • Traffic control signal: 9.18%.

  • Stop sign: 7.40%.

  • Other: 4.23%.

  • Display of plates: 2.22%.

  • Window tint: 2.20%.

  • Suspended license: 0.80%.

  • Seatbelt: 0.44%.

  • Equipment violation: 0.27%.

Outcomes


In Wilton, a pulled-over motorist is most likely to receive a verbal or written warning from a police officer, according to the report.

Nearly 45% of Wilton traffic stops resulted in a verbal warning, 31.26% in a written warning and 17.41% in an infraction. Nearly 5% of stops result in a misdemeanor summons and nearly 2% result in no disposition.

At 76%, the Danbury Police Department had the highest ratio of traffic tickets issued per stop between October 2014 and September 2015. Hartford had the second-highest ratio at 73%, followed by Derby at 66%.

A motorist pulled over in Putnam has a greater chance of receiving a warning from a police officer, as its ratio of warnings per traffic stops is 92.5%. Eastern Connecticut State University police in Willimantic had the second-highest warning rate at 91.4%, followed by Plainfield police (86.7%).

With 8.65% of its traffic stops resulting in searches, Wilton had the fifth-highest search rate in Connecticut. Municipalities with the highest search rates per traffic stop were Waterbury (18.11%), Stratford (9.45%), Derby (9.23%) and Yale University in New Haven (8.97%).

At 0%, the police departments of Eastern Connecticut State University, Groton Long Point and Western Connecticut State University in Danbury had the lowest search rates in the state.

Click here to download the Traffic Stop Data Analysis and Findings for 2014-15.