With 69 reported cases, theft from vehicles was the most commonly reported offense in Wilton last year, according to the town’s 2018 National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) Clearance Report.

Capt. Rob Cipolla said each month, the Wilton Police Department sends its crime statistics for the previous month to the State of Connecticut Crimes Analysis Unit, which oversees state-mandated programs like the NIBRS, and reports data to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

The  2018 NIBRS Clearance Report for Wilton lists 345 total offenses and 119 arrests made for a 32% clearance rate.

The second-most common offense was “all other larceny” with 59 reported incidents; followed by identity theft (40) and drug and narcotic violations (23).

There were also two forcible rapes, one statutory rape, and one pornography/obscene material offense reported in town last year, according to the report.

Cipolla said the forcible rapes occurred in February and December, the statutory rape occurred in March, and the pornography/obscene material offense took place in September.

The types of offenses reported in Wilton last year, followed by the number of arrests made were:


  • Theft from motor vehicles: 69 — 13

  • All other larceny: 59 — 6.

  • Identity theft: 40 — 4.

  • Narcotics violations: 23 — 23.

  • Destruction/damage/vandalism: 20 — 2.

  • Simple assault: 18 — 15.

  • Burglary: 16 — 7.

  • Counterfeiting/forgery: 15 — 8.

  • Drug equipment violations: 15 — 15.

  • Intimidation: 15 — 8.

  • False pretense/swindle: 11 — 11.

  • Motor vehicle theft: 11 — 6.

  • Credit card/ATM fraud: 5 — 0.

  • Extortion/blackmail: 4 — 0.

  • Aggravated assault: 3 — 2.

  • Stolen property offenses: 3 — 3.

  • Theft of motor vehicle parts: 3 — 0.

  • Weapons law violations: 3 — 3.

  • Forcible rape: 2 — 0.

  • Forcible fondling: 2 — 1.

  • Impersonation: 2 — 0.

  • Shoplifting: 2 — 0.

  • Statutory rape: 1 — 1.

  • Pornography/obscene material: 1 — 1.

  • Embezzlement: 1 — 1.

  • Theft from building: 1 — 0.


Cipolla noted that “a single incident may have multiple offenses associated with it.”

Exceptional clearance


The NIBRS Clearance Report indicates whether the offenses have been cleared — either by arrest or “exceptional clearance,” which is the case with one of the forcible rapes and one of the forced fondling incidents.

Cipolla said exceptional clearance is “when, basically, elements beyond law enforcement’s or the police’s control prevent the agency from effectuating an arrest; from formally charging the offender,” such as when a victim reports a crime and then stops cooperating, or when an offender is found to be deceased.

Just because an offense is exceptionally cleared doesn’t mean there won’t be an arrest, Cipolla said.

“If new information is developed, there’s still a potential that [an offense] could be cleared by an arrest,” he said.