Wilton SAT scores rank among state's highest

Wilton High School students, on average, scored very well on the 2013 SAT reasoning tests.

The tests are administered by the College Board and are used by colleges across the country in their admissions process.

The SAT tests students in three areas — critical reading, math and writing.

Out of a possible perfect score of 800 on each of the three sections, Wilton students averaged 593 in critical reading, 597 in math and 605 in writing.

Wilton’s averages were significantly higher than both state and national averages.

In Connecticut, 36,370 students in the Class of 2014 took the SAT. Statewide the averages were 507 in reading, 510 in math and 508 in writing.

Nationwide, 1.67 million students took the SAT in the past year. The average scores were 497 in reading, 513 in math and 487 in writing, almost identical to last year’s averages.

College Board officials said it marks the sixth straight year that SAT average scores have seen almost no movement and there was concern at the lack of long-term improvement. “Flat and stagnant would be the words that we would use,” said Cyndie Schmeiser, the College Board’s chief of assessment.

DRG-A

Wilton did well compared to other schools in its district reference group, DRG-A, which classifies Connecticut school districts by socioeconomic status.

The other schools in DRG-A are Darien, Easton, New Canaan, Redding, Region 9 (Joel Barlow High School), Ridgefield, Westport, and Weston.

In critical reading, Wilton was first in DRG-A, with an average score of 593, followed closely behind by Weston, which scored 592.

Wilton also ranked first in DRG-A in writing, with an average score of 605. Darien was second with 600.

Wilton ranked third in DRG-A in math, with an average score of 597. Darien was first with 611 and Weston was second with 598.

Redesign

The College Board announced this year it plans a major redesign of the SAT in 2016.

From its creation in 1926 until 2005, the SAT was a two-part test, with results reported as math and verbal scores. A perfect score on the tests was 1,600.

A mandatory writing component was added in 2006, also worth 800 points, making a perfect score 2,400.

Starting in spring 2016, the SAT will return to the 1,600-point scale. There will still be three sections — evidence-based reading and writing, math, and the essay — but the essay portion will be optional and scored separately.

Questions in reading and writing will focus on relevant words in context and students will be asked to demonstrate their ability to interpret evidence in the essay portion of the test.

The revised math section will focus on problem solving and data analysis, algebra, and advanced math, which focuses on the student’s familiarity with complex equations.

In addition, the board will no longer deduct points for wrong answers, instead only giving points for correct answers.

To see how Connecticut’s other public schools scored on this year’s SAT test, visit http://1.usa.gov/1yA8Gjx.