State Sen. Toni Boucher (R-26)  recently learned that when it comes to manufacturing technology, good things come in small packages and cleanliness is a must.

ASML is the world’s largest supplier of photolithography systems for the semiconductor industry and manufactures machines for the production of integrated circuits. Boucher visited the company’s Wilton facility June 15 to see how it makes the machines that create microchip circuits.

“People don’t often think of manufacturing as a clean business, but at ASML, I saw how important an absolutely clean environment is to create this wonderful technology,” Boucher said. “The precision and state-of-the-art equipment used offered a fascinating insight into the complexity of the components used in everyday life. I don’t think many of us look at our smartphones and Wi-Fi-enabled devices and think about what is required to make them work. In this world, the smaller, the better.”

The photolithography systems ASML creates are used in the technological quest for smaller, cheaper, more energy-efficient microchips. Boucher suited up to tour ASML’s clean rooms and manufacturing floor where the company created and shipped more than 17,000 of its modules in 2016. The Wilton facility is ASML’s largest in North America, employing 1,250 people, and is on track to achieve its highest headcount growth to-date.

“This is a company that is successful and wants to grow right here in Connecticut,” Boucher said. “They need more engineers and young workers with degrees in advanced manufacturing and advanced math. ASML is working with area colleges and universities to find workers, and has programs in a number of middle schools to get kids interested in science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM). Students and vo-tech and community colleges that focus on math and STEAM skills could have an outstanding opportunity to work with a world-class company like ASML that believes in providing its employees every chance for success. It is imperative that we as a state continue to encourage efforts like this.”

Boucher said she appreciated the tour of the business and looks forward to seeing ASML continue its growth in Connecticut. As co-chair of the legislature’s Education Committee, she said she will keep companies like ASML and their talent needs in mind when developing future education legislation.