Wilton to get nearly $300K increase in state grants

Photo of J.D. Freda
Wilton will be receiving nearly $300,000 more in grants from the state budget, according to statistics provided by the Connecticut Conference of Municipalities.

Wilton will be receiving nearly $300,000 more in grants from the state budget, according to statistics provided by the Connecticut Conference of Municipalities.

Jeannette Ross / Hearst Connecticut Media

WILTON — The town is scheduled to see a nearly $300,000, or 19 percent, increase in funding from state aid after the Connecticut General Assembly adopted its budget earlier this month.

Wilton is projected to receive a total of $1,875,955 in the form of various grants, according to numbers collected by the town from the Connecticut Council of Municipalities. For fiscal year 2020-21, the town received $1,575,975.

The largest sum of money budgeted for the town comes in the form of a grant intended for municipal projects.

“They provided more aid in that sense,” First Selectwoman Lynne Vanderslice said Wednesday. “We are up to over $800,000 in that.”

The town government will receive $842,618 in its 2021-22 budget, a $259,142 jump from its last allotment in that category.

The second most stark jump in received from the state will be a $51,101 reimbursement from the PILOT program. For the last fiscal year, it was zero.

This program references payments in lieu of local property taxes, or PILOT, for property owned and used by the state. The grant aims to reimburse municipalities, and cities, for state-owned and other tax-exempt properties.

“The legislature, over the last number of years, had cut funding for PILOT in general,” Vanderslice said. “In this budget, they reinstated it. That’s why you see it go up.”

She said this is focused more in areas that have tax-exempt properties such as universities or hospitals. Wilton has neither of these, and therefore will not receive reimbursement for that portion of the program.

Additionally, Wilton will be receiving $314,972 in town aid for roads, the same amount budgeted for this fiscal year. Vanderslice said the budgeted funds provide an opportunity to “use to pay for road paving rather than using borrowed money.”

A grant for local capital improvement, or LoCIP, will remain steady at $112,096, as well as the education cost sharing grant at $461,796.

The town’s chief financial officer could not be reached for comment.