The Board of Selectmen on Feb. 6 responded to an order from the Freedom of Information Commission to amend minutes from an executive session held June 14, 2014. The order stems from a complaint filed by town resident Marissa Lowthert, in which she claimed the executive session was improperly noticed and the minutes did not list who attended the session.

The minutes were revised to show that the executive session discussion included talk about  Lowthert’s claim against the town officials.

Lowthert wanted to know why the order was not followed when it was issued in 2015, but First Selectman Lynne Vanderslice could not answer that question because she was not in office at the time.

There are five selectmen. All voted for the amended minutes except Dick Dubow, who abstained, saying he could not remember what was said at the meeting.

“We had so many meetings on similar topics,” Dubow said, explaining why he had to abstain from voting.

Lowthert had said earlier in the meeting at town hall, during the public comment portion, that she was hoping to hear from Dubow and Selectman Michael Kaelin, both of whom were members of the Board of Selectmen at the time of the 2014 meeting.

Vanderslice made it clear elsewhere in the meeting comments on the lawsuit would be limited.

“We have an ongoing lawsuit, so we’re not going to talk in public about that lawsuit or any stratagy,” Vanderslice said. Lowthert and her husband, Christopher, have filed a lawsuit against the town and the Board of Education regarding the air quality at the school and the health effects suffered by their children.

At the end of the meeting, Lowthert thanked the selectmen for their actions with a caveat.

“I’m glad you amended the minutes, I’m glad you chose transparency, but the fact is the actions of this board have not been transparent.”