A sycamore and a silver maple at 151 Skunk Lane may become the newest additions to Wilton’s Notable Tree List.

To make the list — also known as the Significant Tree List — a tree must be jointly determined by Wilton’s tree warden and tree committee to be “of great rarity, size or age, or associated with a historical event or person, or of special value to the community for their unique scenic enrichment to a property.”

In 2015, a white oak on Danbury Road, believed to be more than 200 years old, became Wilton’s first “notable tree.” Three more trees have since been added to the list — a European white birch on Bhasking Ridge Road, a white oak at Gaylord Drive, and a red oak on Musket Ridge Road. All four were accepted as notable trees due to their age and size.

Wilton Tree Committee Chair Kate Throckmorton said the sycamore and maple at 151 Skunk Road are “very old and extremely large.” Throckmorton estimates the trees are around 75 years old.

“Their shapes are elegant and they are unique in being close to each other and the primary home, while both stand majestic in their landscape,” she told The Bulletin.

The owner of the property on which the trees are situated “showed the two trees to one of the Wilton Tree Committee members in a social setting,” said Throckmorton. The member indicated  the trees “might be appropriate to be included on the Significant Tree List,” said Throckmorton, and the owners were “pleased to hear that.”

After other tree committee members examined the trees and “agreed to their stature,” said Throckmorton, the owners decided to apply to have their trees considered for notable tree status.

Residents can nominate notable trees by filling out the Wilton Tree Committee’s Notable Tree Form — available at here — and submitting it to the tree warden or tree committee along with a photograph or sketch of the tree.

Throckmorton said the tree committee provided the form to the Madeira-Castle family, and as of July 31, “they are in the process of completing it.”

Wilton’s Notable Tree List serves as an educational tool and helps raise public awareness of significant trees in town. Although securing a tree on the list doesn’t provide special protection or regulation to it, owners of significant or notable trees may receive guidance from the committee or tree warden to help support and prolong the life of the tree.