New Haven man charged in Milford wrong-way crash on I-95

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A Connecticut State Police cruiser, file photo. The agency said a 25-year-old New Haven resident was arrested Sunday, June 19, 2022, after allegedly driving the wrong way on I-95 north in Milford, resulting in a crash. No major injuries were reported, state police said.

A Connecticut State Police cruiser, file photo. The agency said a 25-year-old New Haven resident was arrested Sunday, June 19, 2022, after allegedly driving the wrong way on I-95 north in Milford, resulting in a crash. No major injuries were reported, state police said.

Contributed / Connecticut State Police

MILFORD — A New Haven man is facing DUI and other charges after state police say he got on Interstate 95 going the wrong way Sunday evening, hitting another car head-on.

The crash resulted in minor injuries, according to state police.

Geovanny Guallo, 25, was charged with driving the wrong way on a divided highway and driving under the influence, state police said. He was also charged with driving without insurance and operating a motor vehicle without a license.

Around 10:10 p.m., Guallo was driving a 2006 Scion TC south in the northbound lanes of I-95 near the Exit 35 on-ramp in Milford, when he collided with a 2017 Kia Sportage Lx, according to state police.

The driver of the Kia and the three passengers were taken to Yale New Haven Hospital, “with suspected minor injuries,” state police said. Guallo complained of a sore ankle following the crash, but refused medial treatment.

State police said an odor of alcohol was observed on Guallo’s breath and he failed a field sobriety test. He was subsequently arrested.

Police said his bond was set at $5,000 and that he was due to appear in Milford court on Monday.

This year has seen a sharp uptick fatal wrong-way crashes along highways. State police say wrong way incidents often involve impaired drivers and occur at night when drivers may not see signs at highway ramps advising them that they’re getting on the wrong way. Often, wrong-way drivers will get on the highway in the left lane— believing they’re driving in the right lane of travel.

Over the past two years, more than 75 percent of drivers involved in fatal wrong-way crashes had blood-alcohol content at least two times the legal limit, or had used marijuana; a review of state data published by Hearst Connecticut Media earlier this month found.