‘Spider-Man: No Way Home;’ A look at CT connections ahead of the movie premiere

Photo of Andrew DaRosa

While fans clamor in anticpation for the conclusion of Marvel Cinematic Universe's wall-crawling trilogy in "Spider-Man: No Way Home," what better way to wait than learning a few new facts about the Marvel hero?

Despite being a New York-based character, we've found a web of Connecticut connections with Spider-Man that range from all eras of his webslinging days, including the years before his creation as well as the ongoing renaissance of his character through film and theatre. 

From Connecticut-raised actors to the character's origins, here are some of Spider-Man's Connecticut connections. 

 

The Hulk on the Merritt

NEW YORK - AUGUST 31: In this photo illustration, vintage Spider Man and X-Men Marvel comic books are seen at St. Mark's Comics August 31, 2009 in New York City. The Walt Disney Co. announced that it plans to acquire Marvel Entertainment Inc. for $4 billion in stock and cash, bringing 5,000 Marvel characters including Spider Man and Incredible Hulk under the Disney umbrella. (Photo Illustration by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

NEW YORK - AUGUST 31: In this photo illustration, vintage Spider Man and X-Men Marvel comic books are seen at St. Mark's Comics August 31, 2009 in New York City. The Walt Disney Co. announced that it plans to acquire Marvel Entertainment Inc. for $4 billion in stock and cash, bringing 5,000 Marvel characters including Spider Man and Incredible Hulk under the Disney umbrella. (Photo Illustration by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Mario Tama/Getty Images

Though Connecticut has been the focal point of a number of Marvel comics, including the iconic 2006 "Civil War" storyline, the character of Spider-Man has been swinging past the buildings of the Nutmeg State for a number of years.

The long-lasting "Web of Spider-Man Vol 1" series, which ran from 1985 to 2012, prominently features the city of Stamford in issue 69, more commonly known as "A Subtle Shade of Green." 

In that issue, Peter Parker, the alias of Spider-Man, is sent to investigate a "wild animal" that has been terrorizing Connecticut, particularly the Merritt Parkway. By the time Spider-Man swings into action, he realizes the animal is actually The Hulk. A brawl ensues between the two, further cementing the rocky relationship between them over the years. 

Other notable appearances by Spider-Man in Connecticut include his involvement in the aforementioned "Civil War" comic series and a battle at the fictional Camp Hammond in Stamford, which cost the life of a Scarlet Spider.

Spider-Man’s best friend auditioned in CT

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA - JUNE 26:Jacob Batalon attends the Premiere Of Sony Pictures' "Spider-Man Far From Home" at TCL Chinese Theatre on June 26, 2019 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA - JUNE 26:Jacob Batalon attends the Premiere Of Sony Pictures' "Spider-Man Far From Home" at TCL Chinese Theatre on June 26, 2019 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

Sure, Spider-Man is the main attraction of his ongoing film trilogy, but what would he be without his best friend, Ned?

From covering his back to cracking a joke at his expense, Ned is the perfect counterpart for Peter Parker and a reason why the current movies have a comical undertone. 

The actor behind the character of Ned, Jacob Batalon, also boasts some Connecticut connections of his own.

According to NBC, Batalon actually filmed his audition tape for an "untitled Marvel project" at his cousin's home in Connecticut. That project would eventually become "Spider-Man: Homecoming," which kicked off the current Marvel Cinematic Universe Spider-Man trilogy. 

"I read a lot of comic books, a lot more than I care to admit," Batalon told NBC about preparing for his role. “I think the one thing that people will relate to is that he’s the fan getting to live his dream. His best friend is Spider-Man."

Spider-Man illustrator started in CT

A Prop Store employee holds a Steve Ditko hand drawn cartoon from The Amazing Spiderman (1966) (estimate £90-110,000), in the Prop Store head office near Rickmansworth ahead of the Entertainment Memorabilia Live Auction on 20th September. (Photo by Andrew Matthews/PA Images via Getty Images)

A Prop Store employee holds a Steve Ditko hand drawn cartoon from The Amazing Spiderman (1966) (estimate £90-110,000), in the Prop Store head office near Rickmansworth ahead of the Entertainment Memorabilia Live Auction on 20th September. (Photo by Andrew Matthews/PA Images via Getty Images)

Andrew Matthews - PA Images/PA Images via Getty Images

In 1962, Stan Lee came up with an idea to create a superhero to appeal to teen comic book readers. His idea would eventually become Spider-Man, the wall-crawling teenager bitten by a radioactive spider. When it came time to put his ideas to paper, Lee went to one of the most notable comic book artists in the industry: Steve Ditko.

However, before his celebrated tenure with Marvel Comics, Ditko served as an artist for the Derby-based Charlton Comics starting in 1954, according to the New York Times. Ditko produced a number of comics for Charlton Comics through 1986, including Captain Atom, who eventually would be aquired by none other than DC Comics

"Ditko lived in a local hotel in Derby for a while," Former Charlton Art Director Frank McLaughlin told comic book history wesbite TwoMorrow's. "He was a very happy-go-lucky guy with a great sense of humor at that time." 

Today, Ditko is credited with creating staple Marvel characters including Spider-Man, Doctor Strange and Eternity.

Broadway's Spider-Man lived in CT

Actor Reeve Carney as Spider-Man celebrates Patrick Page's birthday during curtain call at the Foxwoods Theatre on April 27, 2012 in New York City. 

Actor Reeve Carney as Spider-Man celebrates Patrick Page's birthday during curtain call at the Foxwoods Theatre on April 27, 2012 in New York City. 

Matthew Eisman/WireImage

On June 24, 2011, "Spider-Man: Turn Off The Dark" premiered on Broadway, catapulting everyone's friendly neighborhood Spider-Man onto the stage. In response to a myriad of injuries and poor reviews, the musical was pulled from production in 2014.

Despite the setbacks, the musical did launch the career of Reeve Carney, who won a Grammy Award for his ongoing work with the Hadestown musical on Broadway

Carney said in an interview with The Irish Times that he grew up in Connecticut, where he was inspired to explore musical theater by growing up next to his great uncle, Academy Award-winning actor Art Carney, who is best known for his role in the 1950s sitcom "The Honeymooners."

"Art passed away when I was 20 so we saw him quite a bit when we were kids. He lived in Connecticut, and we lived there when I was younger," Carney said. "The main thing was watching 'The Honeymooners' – I grew up watching that, but I wasn’t aware of his theatre background at all until I started on Broadway myself."

Additionally, "Spider-Man: Turn Off The Dark" was performed at the Foxwoods Theatre, now the Lyric Theatre, which was renamed by Foxwoods Resort Casino from 2010 until 2014.