Strolling into school that first day didn’t feel any different. As I’m sure many of my other classmates would agree, I felt the same walking into school as I have the previous years of my high school career. Granted, I didn’t walk into any wrong classrooms or get lost looking for the pool again. That typical first day hasn’t really changed much since freshman year. Only one thing has changed: it was my last first day.

Waiting by the door as if I just got off the bus from my first day in second grade, my mom quickly asked me, “So, Will, how was your first day as a senior?” Of course, as any loving son would say, I gave her a quick “good” and hustled inside for a snack. The next day the same scenario occurred; however, during my typical after-school snack of a bagel with some assortment of cold cuts on it, I noticed my mom had said “second day” as a senior instead of “first,” as if she were counting down the days until I graduated.

I began thinking about her unassuming countdown, and I realized that we do actually have a limited time left. But, now is just the beginning of what I believe will be one of the best senior years in history, so to describe what I think my senior year will be like, I’ve decided to use my three favorite clichés.

The beginning of the end: Senior year really is the beginning of the end. For most of us, this is our last, but greatest, season of meaningful sports games or play productions. There is no better feeling (or so I am told) than walking onto the court, or field, or stage as an all-mighty senior. And we can’t forget our duty as seniors who aren’t playing a sport that season: to cheer with an overwhelming enthusiasm at every event possible, respectfully of course. Now that all my friends are the ones leading their respective varsity teams, I can assure you that I will be attending more sporting events this year than I probably will the rest of my life.

Time flies when you’re having fun: In my mind this is the ultimate cliché. People say that senior year flies by. All those good times of hanging with friends and partying (I mean that’s what seniors do, right?) and all the bad times of staying up into the a.m. to get college essays done and school papers handed in blend together, and it will be June before we know it. But, as this is our one and only senior year, I can safely say the class of 2013 will cherish every moment of it.

All’s well that ends well: Last year the New York Giants were 7-7 with two games left to play. Against all the odds, however, the Giants won the Super Bowl, a clear example of one of my favorite clichés: “all’s well that ends well.” For the class of 2013, our freshman year was like a preseason, proceeding without much worry or thought. Sophomore and junior years were the regular season, in which we struggled some, but ultimately gave ourselves a playoff berth. Now, as seniors, we are in the playoffs, and I don’t doubt for a second that our senior year will be as hard as an NFL playoff schedule with all the college preparations and AP testing ahead of us. But, when we feel like Super Bowl champions walking out for our diplomas, I know I’ll be able to say that all’s well that ends well.

Will Bruschi is a senior at Wilton High School. He shares this column with four classmates.